YYTT 2: Chakras and Meridians - Tokyo, Japan
From Tuesday, March 01, 2011
To Friday, March 04, 2011
30 hours of Teacher Training

Many peoples first exposure to yoga is physical asana. Millions have been attracted to yoga classes as a way to get fit and relieve stress. Some have grown curious about the deeper traditions of yoga. What is pranayama? Is it more than breathing? And what is meditation? Is it merely an emptying of the mind? In this course we will explore these questions in depth and discover that the theories underlying pranayama and meditation also underlie fully elaborated systems of physiology, medicine, psychology and human spirituality.

Chakras, Meridians and Chi
In China the energy that animates the body is called chi, in India it is called prana. Chi/prana circulates in channels called meridians, and chakras are spiritual centers in the brain and spine that control the flow of chi. Taoist yogis developed chi-gung exercises to control chi and Indian yogis developed prana-yama exercises to control prana. The fundamental premise of both traditions is the same - chi/prana needs to be brought under control if the mind is to be calmed and the true self revealed.

Two traditions of the energetic anatomy
In Indian yoga there are elaborate descriptions of chakras but very sparse descriptions of meridians. In Taoist acupunture there are detailed descriptions of meridians but very sparse descriptions of the chakras. Following the work of Dr. Hiroshi Motoyama this course presents an integrated theory of chakras and meridians. We put these theories into practice by daily asana, pranayama and meditation sessions.

Practice, practice, practice
However exciting the ancient or modern energetic theories might be we will never find them completely satisfying until we have verified their truths in our own experience. So we will practice asana, pranayama and meditation each day, consistently, patiently and without strain. As Kabir said Unless you have lived through something, it is not true.

Yin and Yang Asana practice
Asana practice is essential to prepare the body for sitting still so in addition to lectures and meditations we will practice two hours of yin and yang yoga each day. Yin yoga is the relaxed practice of floor postures for three to five minutes at a time, it emphasizes the connective tissues of the hips, thighs, pelvis and lower spine. By drawing the students awareness away from the muscles and deeper into the bones a deep level of relaxed focus is achieved. Yang yoga is the rhythmic, flowing repetition of movements that require strength and balance. A Yang practice emphasizes the muscle tissues and circulatory system. Yang yoga leaves one feeling invigorated and alert.

Key Concepts:
Learning model: Shravana, Manana, Nididhyasa
Chi/prana
Fascia and Meridians
Meridian pathways
Chakras and the physical body
Chakras and emotions
Chakras and thoughts
Breath and Concentration
Mantra practice
Location Yoga works

Tokyo, Japan

YYTT 2: Chakras and Meridians - Tokyo, Japan

From Tuesday, March 01, 2011
To Friday, March 04, 2011
30 hours of Teacher Training

Many peoples first exposure to yoga is physical asana. Millions have been attracted to yoga classes as a way to get fit and relieve stress. Some have grown curious about the deeper traditions of yoga. What is pranayama? Is it more than breathing? And what is meditation? Is it merely an emptying of the mind? In this course we will explore these questions in depth and discover that the theories underlying pranayama and meditation also underlie fully elaborated systems of physiology, medicine, psychology and human spirituality.

Chakras, Meridians and Chi
In China the energy that animates the body is called chi, in India it is called prana. Chi/prana circulates in channels called meridians, and chakras are spiritual centers in the brain and spine that control the flow of chi. Taoist yogis developed chi-gung exercises to control chi and Indian yogis developed prana-yama exercises to control prana. The fundamental premise of both traditions is the same - chi/prana needs to be brought under control if the mind is to be calmed and the true self revealed.

Two traditions of the energetic anatomy
In Indian yoga there are elaborate descriptions of chakras but very sparse descriptions of meridians. In Taoist acupunture there are detailed descriptions of meridians but very sparse descriptions of the chakras. Following the work of Dr. Hiroshi Motoyama this course presents an integrated theory of chakras and meridians. We put these theories into practice by daily asana, pranayama and meditation sessions.

Practice, practice, practice
However exciting the ancient or modern energetic theories might be we will never find them completely satisfying until we have verified their truths in our own experience. So we will practice asana, pranayama and meditation each day, consistently, patiently and without strain. As Kabir said Unless you have lived through something, it is not true.

Yin and Yang Asana practice
Asana practice is essential to prepare the body for sitting still so in addition to lectures and meditations we will practice two hours of yin and yang yoga each day. Yin yoga is the relaxed practice of floor postures for three to five minutes at a time, it emphasizes the connective tissues of the hips, thighs, pelvis and lower spine. By drawing the students awareness away from the muscles and deeper into the bones a deep level of relaxed focus is achieved. Yang yoga is the rhythmic, flowing repetition of movements that require strength and balance. A Yang practice emphasizes the muscle tissues and circulatory system. Yang yoga leaves one feeling invigorated and alert.

Key Concepts:
Learning model: Shravana, Manana, Nididhyasa
Chi/prana
Fascia and Meridians
Meridian pathways
Chakras and the physical body
Chakras and emotions
Chakras and thoughts
Breath and Concentration
Mantra practice

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