YYTT 1 and YYTT 3 in Soquel, California 2014
From Wednesday, July 23, 2014
To Thursday, August 07, 2014

Our venue: The beautiful Land of Medicine Buddha.

YYTT 1 and YYTT 3: Students taking this course for the second time are automatically registered as YYTT 3 students. The tuition is the same for either course.

This course provides 100 credit hours toward YYTT certification.

Register: To register as a YYTT 1 or a YYTT 3 student please contact Margaret Hartman at: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Room, board and tuition: $3475 for double room, $4225 for a single room.

Prerequisites: Two years previous yoga experience. Prior viewing of two DVD presentations.

The first DVD is Anatomy for Yoga. The second DVD is Yin Yoga. Both are available from Pranamaya.com.

Texts for the course: Students are required to purchase and bring with them two text books, readings from these books are an integral part of the presentation.

Atlas of Anatomy, Volume one. General Anatomy and the Musculoskeletal System published by Thieme. ISBN160406286X

Yin Yoga: principles and practice by Paul Grilley. ISBN 1935952706

Learn to teach yin yoga. More and more teachers and practitioners are exploring yin yoga. This is a natural reaction to what has become an extremely yang health culture. The last several years Paul and Suzee Grilley have been traveling the world teaching workshops focused primarily on yin yoga, refining their presentation of its fundamental anatomical and philosophical foundations. This effort has culminated in the Yin Yoga Teacher's Training program.

Anatomy is the key. The backbone of the yin yoga teacher training is anatomy because without an understanding of muscles and joints true confidence in teaching is elusive. This anatomical insight is crucial when dealing with injuries, contraindications and the logic of adjustments and variations. Anatomy is a vast subject but the basics, properly understood, clarifies and simplifies all yoga practice, regardless of style.

Fourteen joint segments. To analyze why a yoga student can or cannot do a posture we must learn to look past the surface of the body to see it as a moving skeleton. Learning to identify which joints are involved in a Yoga posture and determining their ranges of motion is essential if we are to understand why every person practices poses differently.

Muscles and fascia. 
After learning the 14 joint segments of the body we move on to explore the four myofascial compartments of the thighs and the six myofascial compartments of the torso. These muscle groups are involved in every yoga pose and once a teacher understands them all yoga poses become a transparent combination of these simple muscle and joint movements.

Learn by touching, learn by doing. Yoga anatomy cannot be learned from a book but must be directly experienced in ourselves and our classmates. Our practice of poses is augmented with movement tests we perform on each other. These exercises give a teacher confidence to assess the needs and limitations of their students. Hour by hour, day by day, with patient repetition, the fundamentals of yin yoga become crystal clear.

Yoga is more than muscle and bone. 
Yoga is more than anatomy and the YYTT speaks to these issues by explicitly discussing such things as the theory of exercise, the responsibilities of a teacher, sequencing, adjusting and the energy curve of a class. We also discuss the flow of chi through the connective tissue and its relationship to our physical, emotional and mental well being.

Yin and Yang Asana practice. In addition to lectures and demonstrations we will have two hours of yin and yang yoga each day. Yin yoga is the relaxed practice of floor postures for three to five minutes at a time. A yin practice emphasizes the connective tissues of the hips, thighs, pelvis and lower spine. It prepares the body and mind for longer meditation practices. By drawing the students awareness away from the muscles and deeper into the bones a deep level of relaxed focus is achieved. Yang yoga is the rhythmic, flowing repetition of movements that require strength and balance. A yang practice emphasizes the muscle tissues and circulatory system. Yang yoga leaves one feeling invigorated and alert.

Key Concepts:
Learning model: Shravana, Manana, Nididhyasa
14 joint segment analysis
Tension and compression
Skeletal variation
4 myofascial compartments of the thigh
6 myofascial compartments of the torso
3 layers of a joint
Muscle contraction
Fascial contracture
Theory of exercise
Assisted Yin Yoga
Variations of poses
Props and adjustments

Location Land of Medicine Buddha
5800 Prescott Road
Soquel, CA 95073

YYTT 1 and YYTT 3 in Soquel, California 2014

From Wednesday, July 23, 2014
To Thursday, August 07, 2014

Our venue: The beautiful Land of Medicine Buddha.

YYTT 1 and YYTT 3: Students taking this course for the second time are automatically registered as YYTT 3 students. The tuition is the same for either course.

This course provides 100 credit hours toward YYTT certification.

Register: To register as a YYTT 1 or a YYTT 3 student please contact Margaret Hartman at: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Room, board and tuition: $3475 for double room, $4225 for a single room.

Prerequisites: Two years previous yoga experience. Prior viewing of two DVD presentations.

The first DVD is Anatomy for Yoga. The second DVD is Yin Yoga. Both are available from Pranamaya.com.

Texts for the course: Students are required to purchase and bring with them two text books, readings from these books are an integral part of the presentation.

Atlas of Anatomy, Volume one. General Anatomy and the Musculoskeletal System published by Thieme. ISBN160406286X

Yin Yoga: principles and practice by Paul Grilley. ISBN 1935952706

Learn to teach yin yoga. More and more teachers and practitioners are exploring yin yoga. This is a natural reaction to what has become an extremely yang health culture. The last several years Paul and Suzee Grilley have been traveling the world teaching workshops focused primarily on yin yoga, refining their presentation of its fundamental anatomical and philosophical foundations. This effort has culminated in the Yin Yoga Teacher's Training program.

Anatomy is the key. The backbone of the yin yoga teacher training is anatomy because without an understanding of muscles and joints true confidence in teaching is elusive. This anatomical insight is crucial when dealing with injuries, contraindications and the logic of adjustments and variations. Anatomy is a vast subject but the basics, properly understood, clarifies and simplifies all yoga practice, regardless of style.

Fourteen joint segments. To analyze why a yoga student can or cannot do a posture we must learn to look past the surface of the body to see it as a moving skeleton. Learning to identify which joints are involved in a Yoga posture and determining their ranges of motion is essential if we are to understand why every person practices poses differently.

Muscles and fascia. 
After learning the 14 joint segments of the body we move on to explore the four myofascial compartments of the thighs and the six myofascial compartments of the torso. These muscle groups are involved in every yoga pose and once a teacher understands them all yoga poses become a transparent combination of these simple muscle and joint movements.

Learn by touching, learn by doing. Yoga anatomy cannot be learned from a book but must be directly experienced in ourselves and our classmates. Our practice of poses is augmented with movement tests we perform on each other. These exercises give a teacher confidence to assess the needs and limitations of their students. Hour by hour, day by day, with patient repetition, the fundamentals of yin yoga become crystal clear.

Yoga is more than muscle and bone. 
Yoga is more than anatomy and the YYTT speaks to these issues by explicitly discussing such things as the theory of exercise, the responsibilities of a teacher, sequencing, adjusting and the energy curve of a class. We also discuss the flow of chi through the connective tissue and its relationship to our physical, emotional and mental well being.

Yin and Yang Asana practice. In addition to lectures and demonstrations we will have two hours of yin and yang yoga each day. Yin yoga is the relaxed practice of floor postures for three to five minutes at a time. A yin practice emphasizes the connective tissues of the hips, thighs, pelvis and lower spine. It prepares the body and mind for longer meditation practices. By drawing the students awareness away from the muscles and deeper into the bones a deep level of relaxed focus is achieved. Yang yoga is the rhythmic, flowing repetition of movements that require strength and balance. A yang practice emphasizes the muscle tissues and circulatory system. Yang yoga leaves one feeling invigorated and alert.

Key Concepts:
Learning model: Shravana, Manana, Nididhyasa
14 joint segment analysis
Tension and compression
Skeletal variation
4 myofascial compartments of the thigh
6 myofascial compartments of the torso
3 layers of a joint
Muscle contraction
Fascial contracture
Theory of exercise
Assisted Yin Yoga
Variations of poses
Props and adjustments

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